Three Conflict Managment Ideas

I did two things once I decided the topic for this week of blog to be conflict management. First I began the process of recalling each memorable conflict that I had witnessed or involved from my past work experience. Secondly I began to research and read some of the so-call tips, suggestions, tools, or strategies out there on the internet. There are some tips out there to prevent conflict, such as a “to-do list” in a work place that involves you should return things that you borrow and so on. Initially I just think that some of the tips or helps seem very basic and trivial. It is almost silly to have those as way to prevent work place conflicts.

However, the more suggestions or guides on conflict management that I read through, I realize that most of them have couple of similarities. There are three most common suggestions toward resolving conflict:

 

  1. Focus on the “real” issue that is causing the conflict
  2. The importance of effecting and open communication
  3. Establishing understanding and acceptance for both parties

 

I believe that the first idea, focus on the core cause of a conflict is the very critical since it is the steppingstone toward resolving the conflict. In order to uncover the cause or the source of the conflict so that we can have a better knowledge of what types of the conflict it is and how we can go on to resolving it. There are two basic types of conflicts, Substantive and Emotional. Substantive conflict is a disagreement of expectation or goal, and emotional conflict is difficulties occurring base on negative emotion. Moreover, according to one of the article by Donais he categorizes the source of the conflict to four: Interpersonal, Organizational, Trend/Changes, and External factors. After find out the real problem for each source of the conflict then we can go on use some tools, such as personality test, focus interview, and survey to help us better communicating with the parties involving the conflict. In addition once the core issue is uncover then the resolving process can have more effective dialog between the people who are involved. Lastly, “not all conflicts are bad” that’s why establishing understanding and acceptance is one of the important idea too. Some functional conflicts as constructive resolving can result positive outcome for the group even the organization. An example of this would a policy or procedure improvement after a successful conflict outcome.

 

 

References

 

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4 Responses to Three Conflict Managment Ideas

  1. rheannafaedo says:

    I have had practice in a conciliation role-play which is similar to what you talked about in your blog post about focusing on the “real” issue that is causing the conflict, the importance of effecting and open communication, and establishing understanding and acceptance for both parties. In my conciliation role-play I tried to follow a series of steps that would get the conciliation moving, the steps included:

    Step 1: Identify the issue(s)
    • Briefly describe the situation. What happened? When did it happen? Who else was involved? Is there a reason why it happened?
    • List concerns and why they are relevant.
    • What might the other party’s issues be? How could these issues be affecting them?
    Step 2: The conciliation:
    • What result would be acceptable?
    • What might the other party hope to achieve from the dispute resolution process?
    • What other options could be suggested that might help resolve the matter?
    Step 3: Next steps
    • What caused things to get to this stage?
    • What could have been done differently?
    • What are the consequences if the matter is not completely resolved?
    Opening:
    • Help identify and solve problems
    • Assures confidentiality
    • States that respect should be shown
    • Enforces not to personally attack each other

    Story-telling:
    • Conciliator allows each party to tell their side of the story; corrects each party when they are personally attacking one another
    • Effectively paraphrases every time a party talks
    • Identified issues after each party talked
    • Validates what each party says by paraphrasing
    • Conciliator was able to control the situation; argument did not get out of hand

    Discussion:
    • Conciliator figures out what each party feels and determines their needs and wants
    • Conciliator tries to clam behaviour by re-paraphrasing what party is trying to say
    • Asks parties if they have any solution they can agree on in order to get along
    • After listening to parties needs, conciliator was able to provide effective solutions

    Closure:
    • Asks each party if their sure if they agree and understand each other
    • Paraphrased the solution in order to ensure understanding
    • Identifies that both parties want respect and are willing to move forward

  2. rheannafaedo says:

    I have had practice in a conciliation role-play which is similar to what you talked about in your blog post about focusing on the “real” issue that is causing the conflict, the importance of effecting and open communication, and establishing understanding and acceptance for both parties. In my conciliation role-play I tried to follow a series of steps that would get the conciliation moving, the steps included:

    Step 1: Identify the issue(s)
    • Briefly describe the situation. What happened? When did it happen? Who else was involved? Is there a reason why it happened?
    • List concerns and why they are relevant.
    • What might the other party’s issues be? How could these issues be affecting them?
    Step 2: The conciliation:
    • What result would be acceptable?
    • What might the other party hope to achieve from the dispute resolution process?
    • What other options could be suggested that might help resolve the matter?
    Step 3: Next steps
    • What caused things to get to this stage?
    • What could have been done differently?
    • What are the consequences if the matter is not completely resolved?
    Also, these guidelines can be followed in the conciliation process:

    Opening:
    • Help identify and solve problems
    • Assures confidentiality
    • States that respect should be shown
    • Enforces not to personally attack each other

    Story-telling:
    • Conciliator allows each party to tell their side of the story; corrects each party when they are personally attacking one another
    • Effectively paraphrases every time a party talks
    • Identified issues after each party talked
    • Validates what each party says by paraphrasing
    • Conciliator was able to control the situation; argument did not get out of hand

    Discussion:
    • Conciliator figures out what each party feels and determines their needs and wants
    • Conciliator tries to clam behaviour by re-paraphrasing what party is trying to say
    • Asks parties if they have any solution they can agree on in order to get along
    • After listening to parties needs, conciliator was able to provide effective solutions

    Closure:
    • Asks each party if their sure if they agree and understand each other
    • Paraphrased the solution in order to ensure understanding
    • Identifies that both parties want respect and are willing to move forward

  3. rheannafaedo says:

    I have had practice in a conciliation role-play which is similar to what you talked about in your blog post about focusing on the “real” issue that is causing the conflict, the importance of effecting and open communication, and establishing understanding and acceptance for both parties. In my conciliation role-play I tried to follow a series of steps that would get the conciliation moving, the steps included:

    Step 1: Identify the issue(s)
    • Briefly describe the situation. What happened? When did it happen? Who else was involved? Is there a reason why it happened?
    • List concerns and why they are relevant.
    • What might the other party’s issues be? How could these issues be affecting them?
    Step 2: The conciliation:
    • What result would be acceptable?
    • What might the other party hope to achieve from the dispute resolution process?
    • What other options could be suggested that might help resolve the matter?
    Step 3: Next steps
    • What caused things to get to this stage?
    • What could have been done differently?
    • What are the consequences if the matter is not completely resolved?

    Also, these guidelines can be followed in the conciliation process:

    Opening:
    • Help identify and solve problems
    • Assures confidentiality
    • States that respect should be shown
    • Enforces not to personally attack each other

    Story-telling:
    • Conciliator allows each party to tell their side of the story; corrects each party when they are personally attacking one another
    • Effectively paraphrases every time a party talks
    • Identified issues after each party talked
    • Validates what each party says by paraphrasing
    • Conciliator was able to control the situation; argument did not get out of hand

    Discussion:
    • Conciliator figures out what each party feels and determines their needs and wants
    • Conciliator tries to clam behaviour by re-paraphrasing what party is trying to say
    • Asks parties if they have any solution they can agree on in order to get along
    • After listening to parties needs, conciliator was able to provide effective solutions

    Closure:
    • Asks each party if their sure if they agree and understand each other
    • Paraphrased the solution in order to ensure understanding
    • Identifies that both parties want respect and are willing to move forward

  4. Jim Martens says:

    Very interesting Jack, I never thought of categorizing conflicts. I always find that when im in some sort of conflict it really helps to take a moment and to try and weigh all the options equally and to really analyze my own thinking and justifications to reduce my bias. On the lighter side of things here is a funny video i found about conflict management made by some students from BCIT, it has a kung fu twist too! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFeTRHL0iFQ

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